May 13, 2018: Standing on the Side of Love

Presenter: Karen Fothergill

Sunday, Karen Fothergill, will present a service titled “Standing on the Side of Love”.

As members of the Unitarian Universalist Association:

We believe in the inherent worth and dignity of all people. All people deserve respect and love for who they are.

Right now love and fear are rising up in our nation. We stand on the side of love. We harness love’s power to stop oppression, exclusion, and violence against people who are targeted because of their identity.

We believe elected leaders have a responsibility to unify and advance our communities, not engage in scapegoating or dividing neighbor against neighbor.

We are working to build a society where the color of our skin, the conditions of our birth, who we love, how we worship, and how we express our gender do not determine our worth, rights, and opportunities.

We are all created in God’s image. People of every faith honor God by honoring the diversity of God’s creation.

We believe that the essence of the individual is not based upon outward appearances. No one should be judged based on the size, shape, or functionality of his or her body. We celebrate the diversity of creation, including intersex bodies and transgender identities.

Unitarian Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys.

Unitarian Universalists covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are handicapped accessible. Please park in the rear of the building. Child care is available.

October 8: What is White Privilege?

Guest Speaker, Candise Ramsey from the Southern Idaho Humanist Alliance

inherent worthWe hear terms like ‘white privilege’, ‘inclusion’, and ‘unconscious bias’ a lot these days in the ongoing struggle for racial equality in this country. What do you think and feel when you hear those terms?

Whatever our reaction to the terms or to the endless discussions and debates about anthem protests, Charlottesville, or the acquittal of yet another white policeman in the killing of a black man in St. Louis, it is a fact that racial oppression exists in this country. White privilege is a fact. Our own awareness of what it is and what we can do about it is another matter altogether. It may come in stages, it may come slowly, and when it does we may want to distance ourselves from it, deny it, or explain it away.

How can we confront our own denial and responsibility? How can we turn our awareness into concrete and constructive action rather than let it degenerate into white guilt or white fragility?

These are hard questions for hard times. You may be thinking “we don’t have that problem here.” It’s true we don’t have a large black population here in Southern Idaho. But our communities include a large number of Hispanic brothers and sisters, and many refugees and immigrants from all over the world. For those of us that are white, our awareness of white privilege and how it affects everyone in our community is an important first step.

We will have a guest speaker this week, Candise Ramsey from the Southern Idaho Humanist Alliance. Join us as we explore these questions together.

As Unitarian Universalists, we have a proud tradition of responding to the imperatives of love and justice to work with those of us who are marginalized and oppresses in society and the world.

Unitarian Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys.

Unitarian Universalists covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are handicapped accessible. Please park in the rear of the building. Child care is usually available.

September 17: The Hope at the Heart of Our Faith

Presented by: Rev. Greene

EGreene

This Sunday, Rev. Elizabeth Greene will approach the difficult topic of race, in our society and in the Unitarian Universalist Association. She will reflect on how the issue has developed over time, and how it seems currently.

Rev. Greene will also bring perspective and hopefully some optimism to the situation most of us find ourselves in: mostly white folks in a mostly white area, concerned about justice, equity and compassion.

(9-23 2017) Here is the text from this sermon Rev, Greene has shared with the fellowship, in PDF format: 20170917 Hope at heart of faith (race)

Unitarian Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys.

Unitarian Universalists covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are handicapped accessible. Please park in the rear of the building. Child care is usually available.