October 20th: “Samhain” (the Celtic New Year)

Presenter: Guy Hopkins

The fields are bare, the leaves have fallen from the trees, and the skies are going gray and cold. The wind’s bite turns cold, and spirits long gone roam the lands once more. The autumn season brings in a time of introspection and reflection on our lives.
We are no longer distracted by the summer with its outdoor activities, parties, and bright sun. It is the end of the harvest, the end of the light half of the year and it marks a rest for the earth after the fertility and productivity of the summer months. For this is the night of Samhain.

At its roots it’s a Gaelic holiday that marked the end of the harvest season and the beginning of a new year. Samhain was and is a time for reflection on the previous year and what you have done with your life. It is a time of great magic and mystery and reverence for the supernatural and the “other side.”

It is a time for discerning what negativity lies in our hearts and for planning steps to take in the coming year to make our lives better. Just as the farmer in days of old may have changed his crop plans for the coming year, we too can decide to sow different seeds to bring happiness in the seasons and harvests ahead.

Today Samhain is a time to remember what has gone before us. Our feared based society today has taken away the joy of Samhain, it is up to each and every one of us to relight and rekindle our beautiful ceremonies, by celebrating and rejoicing our ancient traditions of our ancestors without fear.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

October 13th: “We are in a Shared Struggle for Justice”

Presented by: Adrienne Evans

History provides us a critical lens on the past. It helps us to understand that despite our beliefs our lives are not entirely of our own making. The way we tell our collective story and the language and the examples we hold up provide the context for how we come to see the world, ourselves and others in it. We are all products of our shared history and we each have a responsibility to know it and learn from it; all of it!

We must also recognize that there are systemic forces that thrive when we are divided amongst ourselves, and are deeply invested in ensuring that we continue to blame one another for our very real struggles while a minority elite continue to advance an agenda that keeps us struggling.

It is incumbent on each of us to understand that we don’t all have to have the same experiences – and thank goodness we don’t – but we must understand that we don’t all have the same experiences, do not face the same limits and consequences for being who we are and we have much to learn from one another if we truly seek justice for all.

We must understand that our lives are inextricably linked, and our futures bound together. Division only seeks to undermine our collective power and prosperity. We are in a shared struggle for justice that requires each and every one of us. When we come together, we provide the hope of possibility and the ability to build a world that works for ALL of US!

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

October 6: “Belonging to the Earth”

Presenter: Mary Beth Bolin (BUUF Ministerial Intern)

MaryBethBolinRev. Mary Beth Bolin, BUUF Ministerial Intern, will share lessons she learned from those who don’t quite fit in to our human-built systems, those who some would say “don’t belong.”

We will take a moment to step outside the perspective of our industrial society, see it’s brokenness, and hold in our hearts those who are already falling through its cracks. We will explore how we can let ourselves – and everyone – belong to the earth… the only place that can truly be home for us all.

This Sunday’s music will include a piano [Collete Hoglund] and violin [Makayla Connolly] duet for offertory and hymn accompaniment.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

September 29: “We are all Migrants”

Presenter: Ray Cross

We all come from many different lands. Even those of us born here in the Magic Valley are not from here. We all came from somewhere else. Our species did not evolve in Idaho. Our species originated in Africa and eventually arrived here in the Magic Valley through a process of migration. We are all migrants.

Sunday, our message will be how humans are still migrating around the planet. Migration has not stopped. Some questions we will contemplate are: What is a native? What is nativism? Who should we listen to in regard to modern migration? How can we be civil when talking about this subject with someone with whom we disagree? Are migrants who cross our borders today really different from us? Please come ready to discuss with us this topic.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

September 22: “Siding With Greta”

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Presenter: Rev. Jenny Peek

Our visiting minister, Rev. Jenny Peek, will offer her message on the youth-led movement for transformative climate laws.

Climate activist, 16 year old Greta Thunberg from Sweden, urges us to start living as though our house is on fire, because indeed, it is. The Earth is our home and is in a catastrophic crisis. Hope no longer is merely a state of mind: It is action! Action of the people, for our youth and future generations.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

September 15: “Simple Twist of Fate”

Presenter: Mary Beth Bolin (BUUF Intern Minister)MaryBethBolin

This Sunday, Mary Beth Bolin, our new intern minister, will tell us about some of the twists of fate in her life that brought her to the Magic Valley. She will explore the theme for the month: “Expectation.”

How do we live when we expect a dismal fate? How do we live when we expect all the beauty, love, and grace in the world to come towards us, flow through us, and bless the world? When and how does the divine show up in our lives and shatter all our expectations?

Mary Beth is very excited to share her first Sunday with the Magic Valley Unitarian Universalist Fellowship as our new intern minister. She looks forward to sharing a bit of her life’s journey with us and learning from all of yours.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.

September 8: “Where Do We Go From Here?”

Presenter: Anne Martin

As the climate changes and global warming accelerates, and the calls for immediate and dramatic action become more strident, Anne Martin poses the question, “Where do we go from here?” In her sermon on Sunday she explores the consequences of ignoring the problem and doing nothing and presents a vision for the future in which we mobilize our resources like we did during WWII and create a new world where all mankind and all living beings thrive and prosper.

Unitarian-Universalism honors the differing paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on our spiritual journeys. As Unitarian-Universalists, we covenant to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equality and compassion in human relations; and acceptance of one another.

Newcomers of all religious paths or none at all are always welcome. We are working on becoming handicapped-accessible but are not fully there yet. To avoid steps into the sanctuary please enter through the rear entrance to access a sloping hallway to the sanctuary. Please park in the rear of the building or on the street, in front or the side of the building. Child care is available during the adult portion of the service.